Paleo Diet May Be Bad For Cardiovascular Health

Research published earlier this month in the European Journal of Nutrition questions the health benefits of the Paleolithic diet. The Paleo diet claims to mimic the diet of our ancestors. It’s high in meat, fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds but avoids dairy, legumes and grains.

Genoni et al. studied a group of about 100 people over a year. Half the group followed a Paleo diet and the rest followed a diet typical of national recommendations. The authors found that there was a significant difference in the gut bacteria between groups, with an increased presence of Hungatella in the paleo group. Hungatella produces trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a gut-derived metabolite associated with cardiovascular disease. Consequently the levels of TMAO were higher in the Paleo group and this was inversely associated with whole grain intake.

The authors conclude that “although the Paleo diet is promoted for improved gut health, results indicate long-term adherence is associated with different gut microbiota and increased TMAO. A variety of fiber components, including whole grain sources may be required to maintain gut and cardiovascular health.”

Prolonged Sitting Affects Glucose Metabolism

New research published in the journal Diabetes Care has concluded that after meals, regular short bouts of light or moderate walking lower glucose and insulin levels. The subjects were asked to walk around for 2 mins every 20 mins. The effects of these short bouts of walking assist glucose metabolism and may reduce cardiovascular risk.

This adds to the mounting evidence regarding the health risks associated with prolonged sitting.